Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Coast-it Notes #2



From SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel
Fact, foto & fun notes about surfing and the coast



Featured Fotos:


March is the windy month – the perfect time to fly a kite on the beach. These photos from Seal Beach show how much fun it is.
 


If you need a kite or kite-flying lessons, talk to Jason and Melissa at Up, Up & Away Kites in Old Town Seal Beach. Than let out some string… and see how high you can fly!


Test Your Knowledge:
 

1. A young surfer is called a:

a. tadpole   b. grom   c. munchkin
  

2. When you’re riding a wave and are enclosed inside the tube you’re in the:

a. green room   b. boardroom   c. control room
  

3. At Bogart’s coffee shop in Seal Beach a painting of what well-known surfer is on the wall?

a. Brett Simpson   b. Kelly Slater   c. Michael Pless


4. People who use lots of plastic bags or don’t recycle them are called:

a. Plasticos   b. Bag Monsters   c. Cyclotrons   


5. The non-profit Surfrider Foundation, which protects the world’s oceans, waves and beaches, was started 30 years ago at what beach?
 
a. Malibu    b. Doheny     c. Huntington


Answers: 1. b;  2. a;  3. c;  4. b;  5. a 


Featured Funnies:


Why did the surfer cross the beach?

To get to the other tide.


Featured Facts:


The sign on this early surfboard shop in Huntington Beach was spelled wrong, but the owner kept it anyway to save money on a re-do.


Every year 500 billion plastic bags are used worldwide. Of those, 100 billion bags are used in the United States alone.


Seabed mining – excavating the resources on the ocean floor – barely existed a decade ago. Now over 450,000 sq. mi. of sea bottom are under contract to mining operators, creating questions about the effect this will have on the ocean eco-system. 


Gidget, the “girl-midget” teenage surfer of the 1957 novel and 60s surfing movies, was based on a real person, Kathy Kohner. Author Frederick Kohner turned his daughter’s surfing adventures in Malibu into the fictionalized stories that launched the surfing craze. 


Even with the recent rains that California received, more than 98% of the state remains in a drought, making it more important than ever to emphasize water conservation.


Do you have any facts, photos or funnies to share?

Send them to SurfWriter Girls and we’ll “Coast-it.”


Please post your comment below. Comments will appear the next day.


Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel hold the exclusive rights to this copyrighted material. Publications wishing to reprint it may contact them at surfwriter.girls@gmail.com Individuals and non-profit groups are welcome to post it on social media sites as long as credit is given.

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

World Water Day 2015 Times Three



Time is Water


Written By SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel

3 hours.

That’s how long it takes women and children in Africa to find and fetch water for their families’ daily needs.


Think how that time could be spent instead.

Caring for the family, going to school…


or even having fun.


To help make water available for everyone, SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel urge you to support World Water Day, March 22…


by conserving water and doing all that you can to reduce your Water Footprint – the amount of water you use each day for drinking, cooking, personal hygiene, household needs and more.


Sponsored by the United Nations, this year’s World Water Day focuses on Water and Sustainable Development.




Water is essential for all types of development – from growing food to generating electricity, creating industry and building communities.


Achieving sustainability won’t be easy, though. Currently less than 1% of the world’s water is suitable for drinking.


More than two billion people do not have access to safe drinking water or sanitation. And by 2025 more than three billion people – close to half the world’s population – could suffer from water shortages. 


Far from being a regional problem, lack of water is a global problem that requires a global solution…starting with responsible water usage management that minimizes waste and pollution.


Every drop counts.


It’s not just the big things we do that make a difference. It’s all the little things. Like something as simple as taking a shower.


According to the non-profit Surfrider Foundation, which is dedicated to protecting the world’s oceans, waves and beaches, a 10-minute shower can waste more than 40 gallons of water.


To demonstrate the value of each drop of water Surfrider is asking people to pledge to skip their shower on World Water Day. Surfrider CEO Dr. Chad Nelsen stated that the goal is to save 1 million gallons of water.


When it comes down to it, we’re all connected. The less time someone spends taking a shower, the less time someone else has to spend searching for water. 


“A thousand fibers connect us with our fellow men;

 as sympathetic threads, our actions come back to us as effects.”

  Herman Melville, author, Moby Dick.


Please post your comment below. Comments will appear the next day.



Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel hold the exclusive rights to this copyrighted material. Publications wishing to reprint it may contact them at surfwriter.girls@gmail.com Individuals and non-profit groups are welcome to post it on social media sites as long as credit is given.